Connect with us

Marketing

UK: SmartParc submits plans for a 155-acre food processing campus

SmartParc announced that it has submitted plans for its 155-acre high-tech food production campus in former Celanese near Spondon. The planned installation of 1.8 m2 will supply production facilities, start-up incubation equipment and a prospective location for a center of excellence in food production technology.

It is that the program will create 5,000 jobs. Spondon’s flagship site is a component of SmartParc’s ambition to provide a “new sustainable model” for the industry. This will come with vertical agriculture and smart generation for energy production and efficiency.

Jackie Wild, CEO of SmartParc, said: “We are excited to take another step forward in our plans to position Derby at the UK’s long-term center in sustainable and effective food manufacturing. We work strongly with local citizens and stakeholders to ensure that their prospects are incorporated into our regeneration plans and explore partnerships between SMEs and universities to bring our next-generation sustainable food ecosystem to life. We are proud to join with D2N2 and City Hall to revitalize the area.

Strategies for food waste, food miles and carbon production will also be implemented to strengthen UK food security and the competitiveness of the UK PLC on the global stage.

Scott Knowles, managing director of East Midlands Chamber, added: “SmartParc will have a transformative effect on Derby’s economy, creating employment and investment opportunities for the city. SmartParc will position Derby on the map as a nationally important food and beverage production center.

John Forkin, CEO of Derby Marketing, said: “Smart Park is an exciting and cutting-edge concept that will not only create thousands of jobs but will also help diversify our economy. Marketing Derby has been working with your team for some time and we are very happy to see the plans presented so quickly. This is starting to be real, which is wonderful news. “

Subject to the final touch of the city council’s building permit, the company’s goal is to begin remodeling the Celanese site in the spring of 2021 with an initial opening and occupation until the end of the year.
food.

For more information:
SmartParc
www.smart-parc.com

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Asia

Fruit salon – prices are the same as in a jewelry store: the most expensive fruit store operates in Japan

The Japanese are more than extravagant people, they always come up with something, go ahead of the rest of the world. This time they distinguished themselves with the world’s most expensive fruit salon.

Sembikiya is essentially a fruit shop, but the goods here are so expensive and the interior of the store resembles a jewelry salon, so “fruit salon” is a rather apt name.

This is the main store of the Japanese fruit giant Sembikia. It has been run by the same family since 1834. At the time, it was an ordinary fruit shop, but one day the second generation wife of the owner of the shop decided that they could make money in another way.

So, this is more of a gift shop than a store. About 80–90% of these goods are bought as a gift, because in Japan it is customary to give expensive fruits for official events (weddings, business negotiations and hospital visits).

Square watermelon – for only $ 212.

$ 69 for a package of royal strawberries (12 pieces).

Or a watermelon denuke for $ 127 ???

By the way, in 2011, farmers from Hokkaido were very sad because the price of these watermelons fell: the most expensive of them was then sold for “only” $ 4,000. Only 100 of these watermelons are grown in Hokkaido every year.

Yubari melons (one for $ 160 or two for $ 265). These are the most expensive fruits on earth. Once such a melon was sold at an auction for $ 23,500.

What’s so special about them? First, they are grown in ideal greenhouses and covered with hats to keep them from drying out in the sun. Each plant produces only one fruit, and to get the sweetest fruits, farmers cut the fruits ahead of schedule.
The Sembikia family claims that it was she who started the tradition of giving expensive fruits.

Source

Continue Reading

Asia

AGRITECHNICA ASIA and HORTI ASIA

lAAAcGwpgoAAAAASUVORK5CYII=
Organizer AGRITECHNICA ASIA and HORTI ASIA permission to bring the buzzing from the press conference on October 12, 2564 files attached. and. courtesy the media helps public relations in the channel of the person next to updates about events AGRITECHNICA ASIA and HORTI ASIA Regional Summit to be held on 16 November 17 2564 at Korat.
V n u Asia Pacific Association of agricultural German (DLG) held a Pre-Networking and Press Event of AGRITECHNICA ASIA and HORTI ASIA Regional Summit via the online system DLG Connect with exhibitors, more than 100 people from 14 countries have used this opportunity to learn about the jobs summit agro-industrial levels, the region was going to happen in November.
As a host, co-official regional summit AGRITECHNICA ASIA and HORTI ASIA Regional Summit: Dr.Thongplew pile of Monday, permanent Secretary of the Ministry of agriculture and cooperatives have said, a welcome reception, followed by the Dr.Wanida generator Francis Director, office of foreign agricultural has presented the vision of Thailand the field of intelligent manufacturing for sustainable food systems thidarat rotanan Vice President of industry, Nakhon Ratchasima province, said: “Nakhon Ratchasima province, not only is the heart of the production of crops of Thailand but also is the state that is selected to manage regional summit this time.”
The company focus on innovation of the future, CLAAS, Varuna AI & Robotics Ventures, Gessner Industries and Planet explains participation in the development of the food system more sustainable, while Mr. Karsten Ziebell from a collaborative project between the German-English explains the concept and the form of cluster farms can lead to farming sustainable? and invite those interested to attend the meeting, farming cluster of the future (Clusterfarm Future Conference) to be held for the first time within the jobs summit agro-industrial regional.
More information and register to attend at a special price, visit the web site of the work, the
Or contact special price for admission to an enterprise or group call. 02-1116611 (V n u Asia Pacific)
Continue Reading

Marketing

Financing a sustainable global food system

The global food system is unsustainable. While it is worth approximately $8 trillion annually, its negative impact is valued at roughly $12 trillion. And this is not the system’s only contradiction. Around the world, food systems are affected by climate change (due to disruptive weather and rising temperatures) and make significant contributions to it (through greenhouse gas emissions and biodiversity destruction). The millions of jobs they provide are often low-quality and poorly paid. And, most significantly, they fail in their ultimate purpose of delivering affordable, healthy food to all, writes Simon Zadek at eijnsight

The global food system is unsustainable. While it is worth approximately $8 trillion annually, its negative impact is valued at roughly $12 trillion. And this is not the system’s only contradiction. Around the world, food systems are affected by climate change (due to disruptive weather and rising temperatures) and make significant contributions to it (through greenhouse gas emissions and biodiversity destruction). The millions of jobs they provide are often low-quality and poorly paid. And, most significantly, they fail in their ultimate purpose of delivering affordable, healthy food to all, writes Simon Zadek at eijnsight.com.

Because the global food system is fundamentally unviable, change is inevitable. But the radical reforms needed to create an inclusive, sustainable sector that produces nourishing food for the world’s population may have devastating short-term consequences. If we take the wrong approach, incorporating the actual production costs into food systems could trigger widespread bankruptcy, devastate rural unemployment, drive up prices, and increase poverty.

However, the best way to achieve a rapid, fair, and safe transition to a sustainable global food system that can deliver affordable, healthy food for all is a matter of heated debate. This is reflected in the strident and largely unproductive discussions taking place in the run-up to the United Nations Food Systems Summit, to be held during the UN General Assembly this month.

From a production standpoint, advocates of regenerative farming vehemently oppose a new generation of soilless food production, such as lab-grown “alternate protein” and vertical farming. But it is tough to scale regenerative farming rapidly. Soilless systems must be a major part of the solution, given their dramatically reduced carbon footprint and water use, minimal impact on biodiversity, and potential for rapidly delivering cheap, healthy food at scale.

The role of finance in this transition is no less controversial.

There is some merit to complaints about the undue influence of a limited number of private players on decisions that impact the entire global food system. Financialization – the drive to maximize risk-adjusted financial returns – is increasing across the global food system, and market concentration is growing. For example, just ten companies control half of the world’s seed market, and four agribusiness firms account for 90% of the global grain trade. Just 1% of agricultural firms own 65% of the available farmland.

 

Because the global food system is fundamentally unviable, change is inevitable. But the radical reforms needed to create an inclusive, sustainable sector that produces nourishing food for the world’s population may have devastating short-term consequences. If we take the wrong approach, incorporating the actual production costs into food systems could trigger widespread bankruptcy, devastate rural unemployment, drive up prices, and increase poverty.

However, the best way to achieve a rapid, fair, and safe transition to a sustainable global food system that can deliver affordable, healthy food for all is a matter of heated debate. This is reflected in the strident and largely unproductive discussions taking place in the run-up to the United Nations Food Systems Summit, to be held during the UN General Assembly this month.

From a production standpoint, advocates of regenerative farming vehemently oppose a new generation of soilless food production, such as lab-grown “alternate protein” and vertical farming. But it is tough to scale regenerative farming rapidly. Soilless systems must be a major part of the solution, given their dramatically reduced carbon footprint and water use, minimal impact on biodiversity, and potential for rapidly delivering cheap, healthy food at scale.

The role of finance in this transition is no less controversial.

There is some merit to complaints about the undue influence of a limited number of private players on decisions that impact the entire global food system. Financialization – the drive to maximize risk-adjusted financial returns – is increasing across the global food system, and market concentration is growing. For example, just ten companies control half of the world’s seed market, and four agribusiness firms account for 90% of the global grain trade. Just 1% of agricultural firms own 65% of the available farmland.

 

Continue Reading

Trending

Total
17
Share