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Grow light controller for indoor and greenhouse cultivation

Pozeen has announced model GL-CON001, a grower-friendly grow light controller, for indoor and greenhouse cultivation.

Guided by the philosophy of simplicity, the controller is cell-phone-sized and easy to operate with just one hand. With a slidable bracket backside, the controller can hang onto the wall, grow rack, grow light; you can find this almost anywhere in the facility.

The controller, with a display, comes with five buttons. Thanks to the eco-friendly user interface, you can access and set dimming scheduling and sunrise sunset, with a simple tap. The controller takes 0-10V signal and can control up to 25 light fixtures or 200 feet signal wire length.

At the bottom of the controller, there is an RJ12 port as well as a 3-pin push-in terminal block, which makes it possible to work with any light fixtures. A power adaptor is already factory included in the box, which makes installation a matter of “plug and play”.

Compared to Fluence dimmer which only dims up and down, the Pozeen model GL-CON001 provides more functionality at a better cost. The model GL-CON001 also surpasses Gavita EL1 controller with access to sunrise and sunset function. The Pozeen model GL-CON001 grow light controller makes it possible for growers all over the world to find a more friendly, affordable, and advanced entry-level lighting controller.

For more information:
Pozeen
info@pozeen.com
www.pozeen.com

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Asia

Fruit salon – prices are the same as in a jewelry store: the most expensive fruit store operates in Japan

The Japanese are more than extravagant people, they always come up with something, go ahead of the rest of the world. This time they distinguished themselves with the world’s most expensive fruit salon.

Sembikiya is essentially a fruit shop, but the goods here are so expensive and the interior of the store resembles a jewelry salon, so “fruit salon” is a rather apt name.

This is the main store of the Japanese fruit giant Sembikia. It has been run by the same family since 1834. At the time, it was an ordinary fruit shop, but one day the second generation wife of the owner of the shop decided that they could make money in another way.

So, this is more of a gift shop than a store. About 80–90% of these goods are bought as a gift, because in Japan it is customary to give expensive fruits for official events (weddings, business negotiations and hospital visits).

Square watermelon – for only $ 212.

$ 69 for a package of royal strawberries (12 pieces).

Or a watermelon denuke for $ 127 ???

By the way, in 2011, farmers from Hokkaido were very sad because the price of these watermelons fell: the most expensive of them was then sold for “only” $ 4,000. Only 100 of these watermelons are grown in Hokkaido every year.

Yubari melons (one for $ 160 or two for $ 265). These are the most expensive fruits on earth. Once such a melon was sold at an auction for $ 23,500.

What’s so special about them? First, they are grown in ideal greenhouses and covered with hats to keep them from drying out in the sun. Each plant produces only one fruit, and to get the sweetest fruits, farmers cut the fruits ahead of schedule.
The Sembikia family claims that it was she who started the tradition of giving expensive fruits.

Source

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AGRITECHNICA ASIA and HORTI ASIA

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Organizer AGRITECHNICA ASIA and HORTI ASIA permission to bring the buzzing from the press conference on October 12, 2564 files attached. and. courtesy the media helps public relations in the channel of the person next to updates about events AGRITECHNICA ASIA and HORTI ASIA Regional Summit to be held on 16 November 17 2564 at Korat.
V n u Asia Pacific Association of agricultural German (DLG) held a Pre-Networking and Press Event of AGRITECHNICA ASIA and HORTI ASIA Regional Summit via the online system DLG Connect with exhibitors, more than 100 people from 14 countries have used this opportunity to learn about the jobs summit agro-industrial levels, the region was going to happen in November.
As a host, co-official regional summit AGRITECHNICA ASIA and HORTI ASIA Regional Summit: Dr.Thongplew pile of Monday, permanent Secretary of the Ministry of agriculture and cooperatives have said, a welcome reception, followed by the Dr.Wanida generator Francis Director, office of foreign agricultural has presented the vision of Thailand the field of intelligent manufacturing for sustainable food systems thidarat rotanan Vice President of industry, Nakhon Ratchasima province, said: “Nakhon Ratchasima province, not only is the heart of the production of crops of Thailand but also is the state that is selected to manage regional summit this time.”
The company focus on innovation of the future, CLAAS, Varuna AI & Robotics Ventures, Gessner Industries and Planet explains participation in the development of the food system more sustainable, while Mr. Karsten Ziebell from a collaborative project between the German-English explains the concept and the form of cluster farms can lead to farming sustainable? and invite those interested to attend the meeting, farming cluster of the future (Clusterfarm Future Conference) to be held for the first time within the jobs summit agro-industrial regional.
More information and register to attend at a special price, visit the web site of the work, the
Or contact special price for admission to an enterprise or group call. 02-1116611 (V n u Asia Pacific)
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Financing a sustainable global food system

The global food system is unsustainable. While it is worth approximately $8 trillion annually, its negative impact is valued at roughly $12 trillion. And this is not the system’s only contradiction. Around the world, food systems are affected by climate change (due to disruptive weather and rising temperatures) and make significant contributions to it (through greenhouse gas emissions and biodiversity destruction). The millions of jobs they provide are often low-quality and poorly paid. And, most significantly, they fail in their ultimate purpose of delivering affordable, healthy food to all, writes Simon Zadek at eijnsight

The global food system is unsustainable. While it is worth approximately $8 trillion annually, its negative impact is valued at roughly $12 trillion. And this is not the system’s only contradiction. Around the world, food systems are affected by climate change (due to disruptive weather and rising temperatures) and make significant contributions to it (through greenhouse gas emissions and biodiversity destruction). The millions of jobs they provide are often low-quality and poorly paid. And, most significantly, they fail in their ultimate purpose of delivering affordable, healthy food to all, writes Simon Zadek at eijnsight.com.

Because the global food system is fundamentally unviable, change is inevitable. But the radical reforms needed to create an inclusive, sustainable sector that produces nourishing food for the world’s population may have devastating short-term consequences. If we take the wrong approach, incorporating the actual production costs into food systems could trigger widespread bankruptcy, devastate rural unemployment, drive up prices, and increase poverty.

However, the best way to achieve a rapid, fair, and safe transition to a sustainable global food system that can deliver affordable, healthy food for all is a matter of heated debate. This is reflected in the strident and largely unproductive discussions taking place in the run-up to the United Nations Food Systems Summit, to be held during the UN General Assembly this month.

From a production standpoint, advocates of regenerative farming vehemently oppose a new generation of soilless food production, such as lab-grown “alternate protein” and vertical farming. But it is tough to scale regenerative farming rapidly. Soilless systems must be a major part of the solution, given their dramatically reduced carbon footprint and water use, minimal impact on biodiversity, and potential for rapidly delivering cheap, healthy food at scale.

The role of finance in this transition is no less controversial.

There is some merit to complaints about the undue influence of a limited number of private players on decisions that impact the entire global food system. Financialization – the drive to maximize risk-adjusted financial returns – is increasing across the global food system, and market concentration is growing. For example, just ten companies control half of the world’s seed market, and four agribusiness firms account for 90% of the global grain trade. Just 1% of agricultural firms own 65% of the available farmland.

 

Because the global food system is fundamentally unviable, change is inevitable. But the radical reforms needed to create an inclusive, sustainable sector that produces nourishing food for the world’s population may have devastating short-term consequences. If we take the wrong approach, incorporating the actual production costs into food systems could trigger widespread bankruptcy, devastate rural unemployment, drive up prices, and increase poverty.

However, the best way to achieve a rapid, fair, and safe transition to a sustainable global food system that can deliver affordable, healthy food for all is a matter of heated debate. This is reflected in the strident and largely unproductive discussions taking place in the run-up to the United Nations Food Systems Summit, to be held during the UN General Assembly this month.

From a production standpoint, advocates of regenerative farming vehemently oppose a new generation of soilless food production, such as lab-grown “alternate protein” and vertical farming. But it is tough to scale regenerative farming rapidly. Soilless systems must be a major part of the solution, given their dramatically reduced carbon footprint and water use, minimal impact on biodiversity, and potential for rapidly delivering cheap, healthy food at scale.

The role of finance in this transition is no less controversial.

There is some merit to complaints about the undue influence of a limited number of private players on decisions that impact the entire global food system. Financialization – the drive to maximize risk-adjusted financial returns – is increasing across the global food system, and market concentration is growing. For example, just ten companies control half of the world’s seed market, and four agribusiness firms account for 90% of the global grain trade. Just 1% of agricultural firms own 65% of the available farmland.

 

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